David Bowie was an easy target when he tried an ambitious new musical direction at the age of 50

Plenty has been said of David Bowie's chameleon-like career, immersing into and even pre-empting music trends ​all through his amazing career.

His experiment with ​Drum n Bass and Jungle, perhaps in a move most likely intended to bring him up alongside contemporaries such as Goldie and The Prodigy, was showcased in 1997 with the album 'Earthling' (stylised as EART HL I NG), his 21st studio album.

Developing ​further ​musical styles previously explored on ​his​ album 'Outside' from 1995, Earthling showcases an electronica-influenced sound partly inspired by the industrial and drum ​n bass culture of the 90s, particularly exhibiting jungle and techno. The album is to say the least, a bizarre mashup, yet strangely appealing. Bowie manages to fuse industrial with drum n bass, alt dance, and alt-rock, to astonishing success. The sounds are hard, the beats are all hyper-speed and it's unlike any other album Bowie ever made. Although the songs are distinctly Bowie, it is also unlike any album any​ artist has ever made.

The tracks on Earthling are linked only by the power of the turbocharged guitars, the energy and intensity of the drum​ and ​bass rhythms and Bowie’s signature baritone croon. He uses drum n bass music which was the craze among British techno DJs as a rhythmic foundation throughout, upping the intensity of songs like ​'​Telling Lies​'​and the classic ​'​Battle for Britain (The Letter)’. At the time, raves brought electronica to the forefront of public consciousness. Bowie sensing this, tapped into this music trend and created 'Earthlings'.

In later decades, critics and biographers viewed Earthling with mixed feelings. Some criticised it for lacking innovation at a time when the drum ​n bass craze had already matured; others considered it a worthwhile addition to a very underrated decade. However Bowie's enduring enthusiasm for new musical adventures must be applauded.

The album didn't break any new ground, but it certainly captured the mood of contemporary popular culture​,​ particularly that exciting period in British dance music.

For those of you who aren't familiar with Bowie's stable of work his incredible body of music spanning a number of decades, genres and styles is definitely worth a listen.

His discography consists of 26 studio albums, 21 live albums, 46 compilation albums, 10 extended plays, 128 singles, 3 soundtracks and 12 box sets. He also released 28 video albums and 72 music videos.

Make sure you check out the album EART HL I NG and the amazing opening track.

Plenty has been said of David Bowie's chameleon-like career, immersing into and even pre-empting music trends ​all through his amazing career.

His experiment with ​Drum n Bass and Jungle, perhaps in a move most likely intended to bring him up alongside contemporaries such as Goldie and The Prodigy, was showcased in 1997 with the album 'Earthling' (stylised as EART HL I NG), his 21st studio album.

Developing ​further ​musical styles previously explored on ​his​ album 'Outside' from 1995, Earthling showcases an electronica-influenced sound partly inspired by the industrial and drum ​n bass culture of the 90s, particularly exhibiting jungle and techno. The album is to say the least, a bizarre mashup, yet strangely appealing. Bowie manages to fuse industrial with drum n bass, alt dance, and alt-rock, to astonishing success. The sounds are hard, the beats are all hyper-speed and it's unlike any other album Bowie ever made. Although the songs are distinctly Bowie, it is also unlike any album any​ artist has ever made.

The tracks on Earthling are linked only by the power of the turbocharged guitars, the energy and intensity of the drum​ and ​bass rhythms and Bowie’s signature baritone croon. He uses drum n bass music which was the craze among British techno DJs as a rhythmic foundation throughout, upping the intensity of songs like ​'​Telling Lies​'​and the classic ​'​Battle for Britain (The Letter)’. At the time, raves brought electronica to the forefront of public consciousness. Bowie sensing this, tapped into this music trend and created 'Earthlings'.

In later decades, critics and biographers viewed Earthling with mixed feelings. Some criticised it for lacking innovation at a time when the drum ​n bass craze had already matured; others considered it a worthwhile addition to a very underrated decade. However Bowie's enduring enthusiasm for new musical adventures must be applauded.

The album didn't break any new ground, but it certainly captured the mood of contemporary popular culture​,​ particularly that exciting period in British dance music.

For those of you who aren't familiar with Bowie's stable of work his incredible body of music spanning a number of decades, genres and styles is definitely worth a listen.

His discography consists of 26 studio albums, 21 live albums, 46 compilation albums, 10 extended plays, 128 singles, 3 soundtracks and 12 box sets. He also released 28 video albums and 72 music videos.

Make sure you check out the album EART HL I NG and the amazing opening track.